I’m doing Vine now

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At the risk of sounding like a one of those plastic goons who turn to the camera in an advert all wide-eyed and excited about a new product, “Vine! Everyone’s doing it!”

Yes, after Instagram or Pinterest, even I, an avid user of social media platforms didn’t think there was enough room for another tech obsession but Vine has squeezed into my digital life. From the makers of Twitter, Vine is essentially a video version of Instagram. Each Vine video can last for six seconds and loops like an animated GIF does.

Like most social media networks, it sounds nothing special on paper but like all the good things in life, it’s the people and what they do within those limitations that make it captivating. What gives Vine a scope beyond a mere six second look into the lives of others is the clever use of self-editing. A user must press the screen on their phone until the Vine hits its maximum duration meaning, the platform can be used to create little short stories through narration.

That rudimentary editing ability was exploited by Adam Goldberg (an actor/director known for his roles in Friends and Saving Private Ryan) who makes short horror movies which are both jarring and inventive. Goldberg has already been named the King of Vine but the platform is only two months old and he current has 35,000 followers, nothing compared to Twitter’s celebrity average of millions.

Goldberg’s early adoption shows what creative minds can use it for. Of course, the rest of us can be perfectly content to post Vines of pets, children and what’s outside the window but Vine’s curated “Explore” section encourages you to do more with hashtags like #remakes, #favthings, #vineportraits and #magic featuring clever videos. The more you use Vine, the more it feels that’s why your phone has a video feature.

Vine is available on iOs with other platforms launching soon.

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In today’s Day & Night: A happy Eel

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We’ve got an interview With Eels frontman Mark Everett about his happy new direction, Bastille’s Dan Smith, a look at And So I Watch You From Afar’s part in the Northern revival, Tim Roth on baddies, Declan Cashin on the horror of cooking for others and all the usual reviews, listings, digital and food reviews.

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Listen to albums reviewed on Friday from Bastille, Dido & Girls Names

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Every Friday, John Meagher reviews a selection of new release albums in Day And Night and we’ll publish a Spotify playlist of the albums (where available) so you can listen and judge for yourself.

This week’s reviews included Josh Ritter’s new album The Beast in his Tracks and Stereophonics’ Graffiti on the Train which are not currently available for listening on Spotify, though the latter has a commentary about the album track by track. What is present for your listening pleasure are Bastille’s Bad Blood (“seamlessly
blending classic indie sounds with a healthy dose of pure pop.”), Dido’s The Girl Who Got Away which has production from Brian Eno and Belfast’s Girls Names second album The New Life- “a wonderfully accomplished and ambitious collection that appears inspired by the cerebral post-punk sound of Joy Division and early Cure.”

Listen to the albums available:

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In this week’s Day & Night: Soul’s New High Priestess

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SOUL’S NEW HIGH PRIESTESS
Laura Mvula tells Ed Power about her meteoric rise from receptionist to soul star

PLUS
EXCLUSIVE –THE RETURN OF DIDO

After five years out of the spotlight, Dido has emerged with an new album and an exclusive interview with Ailbhe Malone

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A RITTER SWEET SYMPHONY

Josh Ritter poured his heart and heartbreak into his latest album, he tells Eamon Sweeney

LIANNE LE HAVAS
On her Brit Awards snub, chatting with Prince down the pub and why she’ll be first in line for tickets for the forthcoming B*Witched reunion

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Listen to albums reviewed on Friday from Keaton Henson, Pissed Jeans & Petula Clarke

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Every Friday, John Meagher reviews a selection of new release albums in Day And Night and we’ll publish a Spotify playlist of the albums (where available) so you can listen and judge for yourself.

This week’s reviews included Thom Yorke’s new side-project Atoms For Peace, Johnny Marr’s The Messenger, 80 year-old Petula Clark’s Lost in You, UK folk singer Keaton Henson’ Birthdays and Sub Pop’s Pissed Jeans.

Listen to the albums available:

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